Friday, April 04, 2008

question

writers by nature are loners?

5 Comments:

At 11:01 AM, Blogger Steve Caratzas said...

Natcherly.

 
At 4:18 PM, Blogger Catalin said...

depends how you define 'loner' of course. I think we are often a little bit (or a lot) on the outside of the mass of humanity because it's hard to get enough perspective from the inside to write about it.

Are we drawn out to the edges because it gives us a better view, or are we writers because we're already up here on the ragged hill outside of town, looking out over the valley saying, "oh my god, look at this view, look at those people, look at that smog, look at that sunset--look around you, people!"?

I remember Connie once talking about the contradiction that writers have to be outward-looking enough to observe the world, inward-looking enough to understand what we are perceiving, humble enough to struggle to find the right words, yet arrogant enough to believe that we have something worth saying.

What do you think? Aloneness leads to writing, or writing leads to aloneness?

 
At 10:59 PM, Blogger Clifford Duffy said...

hahah you always ask such funny questions. im prone to say
nature are writers by alone
naturally are writers alone by nature...

Blessing!S

 
At 4:13 AM, OpenID neverneutral said...

Not "by nature", but sometimes I identify myself a lot with Blanchot's book about Kafka. There's "the World" (the others) and "the Work", and sometimes the tension is unbearable, but it's at the same time what makes writing happen. For someone like F. Scott Fizgerald, "hell" was "other people". Maybe that's what Sartre meant as well. And then again...

 
At 4:14 AM, OpenID neverneutral said...

Shit, I didn't mean to namedrop so much. You know what I mean..?

 

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